En webDelFuturo su página web es posicionada

en el mercado de su competencia

Fusionamos su estrategia web con redes sociales

más importantes para su negocio

Toda web es importante por lo que cada página 

tiene todos los beneficios y ventajas que ofrecemos

En webDelFuturo nos interesa presentar la información más actual y de importancia relacionada con los servicios que prestamos por lo que a continuación presentamos diferentes fuentes de consulta sobre diferentes temas de interés. Cada una de nuestra fuentes de información proviene de sitios web de alto renombre en el plano tecnológico actual. Si es de su interés podríamos incluir noticias de más fuentes de información de acuerdo a sus necesidades.

 

Google Webmaster Central Blog

Official news on crawling and indexing sites for the Google index.

A revamped SEO Starter Guide

There are lots of resources out there to create great websites. Website owners often ask Google what our recommended practices are to make sure great websites are search-engine-friendly. Traditionally, our resources for beginners were the SEO Starter Guide and the Webmaster Academy. To help webmasters create modern, search-engine-friendly websites, we’re announcing today the launch of a new, updated SEO Starter Guide.

The traditional SEO Starter Guide lists best practices that make it easier for search engines to crawl, index and understand content on websites. The Webmaster Academy has the information and tools to teach webmasters how to create a site and have it found in Google Search. Since these two resources have some overlapping purpose and content, and could be more exhaustive on some aspects of creating a user friendly and safe website, we’re deprecating the Webmaster Academy and removing the old SEO Starter Guide PDF.



The updated SEO Starter Guide will replace both the old Starter Guide and the Webmaster Academy. The updated version builds on top of the previously available document, and has additional sections on the need for search engine optimization, adding structured data markup and building mobile-friendly websites.
This new Guide is available in nine languages (English, German, Spanish, French, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian and Turkish) starting today, and we’ll be adding sixteen more languages very soon.

Go check out the new SEO Starter Guide, and let us know what you think about it.

For any questions, feel free to drop by our Webmaster Help Forums!

Posted by Abhas Tripathi, Search Quality Strategist

Author: Google Webmaster Central
Posted: December 12, 2017, 4:30 pm

#NoHacked 3.0: How do I know if my site is hacked?

Last week #NoHacked is back on our G+ and Twitter channels! #NoHacked is our social campaign which aims to bring awareness about hacking attacks and offer tips on how to keep your sites safe from hackers. This time we would like to start sharing content from #NoHacked campaign on this blog in your local language!

Why do sites get hacked? Hackers havedifferent motives for compromising a website, and hack attacks can be very different, so they are not always easily detected. Here are some tips which will help you in detecting hacked sites!

  • Getting started:

    Start with our guide "How do I know if my site is hacked?" if you've received a security alert from Google or another party. This guide will walk you through basic steps to check for any signs of compromises on your site.

  • Understand the alert on Google Search:

    At Google, we have different processes to deal with hacking scenarios. Scanning tools will often detect malware, but they can miss some spamming hacks. A clean verdict from Safe Browsing does not mean that you haven't been hacked to distribute spam.

    • If you ever see "This site may be hacked", your site may have been hacked to display spam. Essentially, your site has been hijacked to serve some free advertising.
    • If you see"This site may harm your computer" beneath the site URL then we think the site you're about to visit might allow programs to install malicious software on your computer.
    • If you see a big red screen before your site, that can mean a variety of things:
      • If you see "The site ahead contains malware", Google has detected that your site distributes malware.
      • If you see "The site ahead contains harmful programs", then the site has been flagged for distributing unwanted software.
      • "Deceptive site ahead" warnings indicate that your site may be serving phishing or social engineering. Your site could have been hacked to do any of these things.
  • Malvertising vs Hack:

    Malvertising happens when your site loads a bad ad. It may make it seem as though your site has been hacked, perhaps by redirecting your visitors, but in fact is just an ad behaving badly.

  • Open redirects: check if your site is enabling open redirects

    Hackers might want to take advantage of a good site to mask their URLs. One way they do this is by using open redirects, which allow them to use your site to redirect users to any URL of their choice. You can read more here!

  • Mobile check: make sure to view your site from a mobile browser in incognito mode. Check for bad mobile ad networks.

    Sometimes bad content like ads or other third-party elements unknowingly redirect mobile users. This behavior can easily escape detection because it's only visible from certain browsers. Be sure to check that the mobile and desktop versions of your site show the same content.

  • Use Search Console and get message:

    Search Console is a tool that Google uses to communicate with you about your website. It also includes many other tools that can help you improve and manage your website. Make sure you have your site verified in Search Console even if you aren't a primary developer on your site. The alerts and messages in Search Console will let you know if Google has detected any critical errors on your site.

If you're still unable to find any signs of a hack, ask a security expert or post on our Webmaster Help Forums for a second look.

The #NoHacked campaign will run for the next 3 weeks. Follow us on our G+ and Twitter channels or look out for the content in this blog as we will be posting summary for each week right here at the beginning of each week! Stay safe meanwhile!

Author: Google Webmaster Central
Posted: December 8, 2017, 6:54 pm

Rendering AJAX-crawling pages

The AJAX crawling scheme was introduced as a way of making JavaScript-based webpages accessible to Googlebot, and we've previously announced our plans to turn it down. Over time, Google engineers have significantly improved rendering of JavaScript for Googlebot. Given these advances, in the second quarter of 2018, we'll be switching to rendering these pages on Google's side, rather than on requiring that sites do this themselves. In short, we'll no longer be using the AJAX crawling scheme.

As a reminder, the AJAX crawling scheme accepts pages with either a "#!" in the URL or a "fragment meta tag" on them, and then crawls them with an "?_escaped_fragment_=" in the URL. That escaped version needs to be a fully-rendered and/or equivalent version of the page, created by the website itself.

With this change, Googlebot will render the #! URL directly, making it unnecessary for the website owner to provide a rendered version of the page. We'll continue to support these URLs in our search results.

We expect that most AJAX-crawling websites won't see significant changes with this update. Webmasters can double-check their pages as detailed below, and we'll be sending notifications to any sites with potential issues.

If your site is currently using either #! URLs or the fragment meta tag, we recommend:

  • Verify ownership of the website in Google Search Console to gain access to the tools there, and to allow Google to notify you of any issues that might be found.
  • Test with Search Console's Fetch & Render. Compare the results of the #! URL and the escaped URL to see any differences. Do this for any significantly different part of the website. Check our developer documentation for more information on supported APIs, and see our debugging guide when needed.
  • Use Chrome's Inspect Element to confirm that links use "a" HTML elements and include a rel=nofollow where appropriate (for example, in user-generated content)
  • Use Chrome's Inspect Element to check the page's title and description meta tag, any robots meta tag, and other meta data. Also check that any structured data is available on the rendered page.
  • Content in Flash, Silverlight, or other plugin-based technologies needs to be converted to either JavaScript or "normal" HTML, if their content should be indexed in search.

We hope that this change makes it a bit easier for your website, and reduces the need to render pages on your end. Should you have any questions or comments, feel free to drop by our webmaster help forums, or to join our JavaScript sites working group.


Posted by John Mueller, Google Switzerland
Author: Google Webmaster Central
Posted: December 4, 2017, 1:57 pm

A reminder about “event” markup

Lately we’ve been receiving feedback from users seeing non-events like coupons or vouchers showing up in search results where “events” snippets appear. This is really confusing for users and also against our guidelines, where we have added additional clarification.

So, what’s the problem?

We’ve seen a number of  publishers in the coupons/vouchers space use the “event” markup to describe their offers. And as much as using a discount voucher can be a very special thing, that doesn’t make coupons or vouchers events or “saleEvents”. Using Event markup to describe something that is not an event creates a bad user experience, by triggering a rich result for something that will happen at a particular time, despite no actual event being present.

Here are some examples to illustrate the issue:

Since this creates a misleading user experience, we may take manual action on such cases. In case your website is affected by such a manual action, you will find a notification in your Search Console account. If a manual action is taken, it can result in structured data markup for the whole site not being used for search results.  

While we’re specifically highlighting coupons and vouchers in this blogpost, this applies to all other non-event items being annotated with “event” markup as well -- or, really, for applying a type of markup to something other than the type of thing it is meant to describe.

For more information, please visit our developer documentation or stop by our Webmaster Forum in case you have additional questions!


Posted by Sven Naumann, Trust & Safety Search Team
Author: Google Webmaster Central
Posted: November 27, 2017, 5:01 pm

TechRadar: Mobile computing news

TechRadar UK latest feeds

Samsung's new Notebook 9 Pen is a miniature, metal 2-in-1 machine

Samsung has unveiled a new, all-metal 2-in-1 laptop with a built-in S Pen stylus and 13.3-inch FHD touch display.
Author:
Posted: December 14, 2017, 2:00 am

Google Assistant is coming to many Android tablets soon

Reversing its 2016 decision, Google’s helpful voice assistant will be heading to tablets, and more phones, too.
Author:
Posted: December 13, 2017, 6:56 pm

Best gaming mouse 2017: the best gaming mice we've tested

The best gaming mouse for you ranks among this list, so what will it be?
Author:
Posted: December 12, 2017, 8:35 pm

The best cheap laptop deals for Christmas 2017

The best deals on cheap laptops in the US – now for December 2017.
Author:
Posted: December 12, 2017, 7:35 pm

 



Formulario de contacto:

9 + 1 =

“En webDelFuturo le entregamos una web posicionada en el mercado de su competencia”

“No se conforme con webs que solo aparezcan en una tarjeta de presentación. Haga que su web sirva para las metas de su negocio”

“La web más las redes sociales crean nuevos espacios de negocios. Las aplicaciones móviles están para quedarse, no se quede fuera de la era digital”

Galo Hernández

CEO